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Bad Airsoft Habits and Practices

Man holding airsoft rifle

Here at Surplus Store, airsoft is our passion. We love the sport and everything that comes with it, the modification, the tense battle moments and the camaraderie of playing with teammates. Unfortunately, it’s not always plain sailing and very rarely there can be things that happen on the battlefield or in the arena that can ruin a day of airsoft. Granted, some things that happen are out of everyone’s control, but sometimes players’ bad practises and bad habits can put a real dampener on a day out. So we’ve racked our brains and put together a list of all of the things you should and shouldn’t be doing to help the day run smoothly and be an enjoyable experience for all! Don’t be the person that ruins your’s any everyone else’s day!

Not Taking Hits

This applies to both you and the rest of the players on the field. If you’re not taking your hits (calling that you’ve been shot and returning to respawn) then this can ruin the airsoft experience for others that are playing fairly. Make sure you’re gracious in defeat and hold your arm up when you’ve been hit. A quick “Nice shot mate!” wouldn’t go amiss either (as long as it doesn’t give their position away!)

Cheat Calling

If you’re playing against someone who isn’t calling their hits and you know they’ve definitely been shot by you or a teammate, DON’T start shouting at them. Although there will be a handful of players that don’t play by the rules, airsoft relies on a community playing by the rules and 99% of the time, there will be reasonable explanations for players not calling hits; it may even be you’ve been dry firing your gun without realising! Let the Marshals handle it, that’s what they’re there for!

Head Shots

This is a bit of a grey area for airsoft really. For players that have experience playing shooter video games, it will be instinctual to aim for the head as that is often rewarded with in-game bonuses. Unfortunately, in the real world, headshots just hurt more. A rule of thumb to go by, if an opponent presents their body as a possible target, don’t aim for their head; it should be the last resort if their head is the only target. We’d also suggest not using fully automatic fire rate when aiming for the face, this can cause injury and won’t be fun for the recipient.

Moaning About Being Shot

The truth is, you’re not Bruce Willis or Tom Cruise and you can’t breeze through enemies without taking a hit; even the best players get shot! Whether you like it or not, being shot is part of the game and even airsoft pistols can sometimes hurt, but this is what you’re signing up for! If you moan about being shot in the face, or anywhere else for that matter, then perhaps airsoft isn’t the game for you.

Be Respectful to Other People’s Game and Tactics

Granted, some players take the game more seriously than others, but it’s important that you respect how your teammates are playing the game and don’t ruin their experience. If your team are playing tactically and pulling off a great stealthy flank, don’t give away their position by shouting about your weekend! This can only lead to you being shot and your team getting annoyed with you. There is a time and a place for conversation on the battlefield, be mindful and pick your moments.

When You’re Dead, You’re DEAD!/Dead Men Don’t Talk

Ok, so this might be a bit extreme, but it’s not entirely untrue. If you’re an experienced player, chances are the person that shot you has been working hard to get that position, so letting your team know where he or she is after you’re down is cheating and just poor sportsmanship. Play by the rules and keep quiet after you’ve been shot. Additionally, letting a teammate know an enemy position will detract from the sense of their achievement when they get the shot, don’t ruin it for everyone!

Don’t Take Matters Into Your Own Hands

As mentioned already in the article, normally there are good reasons as to why people might not be calling hits, but if this is something that persists and seems intentional, let the ref/marshal know as that’s why they’re there. If you think someone is ‘bending’ the rules to their own game, don’t take it upon yourself to resolve the situation.

Being Mindful and Respectful

This seems like common sense but is always worth mentioning people can get caught up with the banter and start to push the limits. It’s important to remember that not everyone has the same tolerances for dark humour so keep the banter light. Also, if you’re left questioning some of the ‘funny’ comments you’re making and not getting the responses you’re looking for, trust your gut and tone it down.

Play Within the Spirit of the Game

The beauty of airsoft is that once the final bell rings, you get to put your normal clothes back on and go home, what happens on the field isn’t life or death and certainly doesn’t affect the real world. It’s easy to get caught up in the moment and start to lose your cool or to think of ways to skirt around the edge of the rules to get an advantage, but this can only end one way.

If you think you’re going to start seeing red, take a few minutes out of the game to cool off, getting mad and causing a scene will ruin your day and everyone else’s so we’d suggest taking the easy option and have a break. Follow the rules, have respect and play for enjoyment first and winning second (as cliched as it sounds).

We’d be interested to know what bad practises you hate seeing on the field and how the community can put a stop to them! Let us know on Facebook and Twitter!

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