Battlefield 1 screenshot – historically accurate according to experts

Being one of the most anticipated games to come out this year, Battlefield 1 is getting a lot of people excited for its release – and the historical trailer released in May certainly added to the hype.

But as with most historical adaptations – whether it be films, games or television series – you often wonder how accurate the representation really is.

Well, history experts from The Great War (a documentary series following the events of WWI exactly 100 years later) have taken to analysing the trailer in depth, and found that the creators really did their homework.

The Great War takes apart the cinematic trailer frame by frame, and concluded that the tactics, technology and uniform from the era have been created pretty spot on.

Some scenes in the trailer seemed to be exaggerated, such as where the German soldier used a shovel to knock down an enemy. However, close combat training and experience during World War 1 taught fighters that bayonets tended to get stuck in victims, so the shovel was the next best thing.

Another question asked by watchers was why British soldiers would carry anti-armour rifles which belonged to German soldiers. Well, during warfare, it was quite common for soldiers to pick superior weaponry from the opposing side, and ditch their current gun.

It is worth noting that Battlefield 1 should not be regarded as a war simulator, as it does have its fair share of “truth stretching” as many FPS games do.

However, if the game remains true to the teaser trailer, it seems to have been given the thumbs up from historical experts. You can watch the 15-minute video analysing the trailer for yourself at the bottom of the page, which is a pretty interesting history lesson in itself!

If you are interested historical firearms, we have a number of air pistols and airsoft guns based on authentic designs from the past. Why not take a look on our website, or come and visit us in store?

Watch the trailer analysis for yourself here:

Photo courtesy of Gerwus on YouTube, under Creative Commons